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Trumbull War Office

Trumbull War Office

From 1775-1783, Gov. Jonathan Trumbull Sr. and the Council of Safety met more than 500 times at this small storehouse to plan Connecticut’s military, logistical, financial, and political actions during the American Revolution.

The Trumbull War Office is owned and operated by the Connecticut Sons of the American Revolution.

Ebenezer Avery House

Ebenezer Avery House

On September 6, 1781, Benedict Arnold’s forces attacked New London and Fort Griswold in Groton. The nearby home of Ebenezer Avery, himself severely wounded, served as a field hospital.  It is said it took generations for the bloodstained floors to be worn away.

The Avery House is on the grounds of Ft. Griswold State Park, and administered by the Avery Memorial Association.

Leffingwell House Museum

Leffingwell House Museum

Merchant Christopher Leffingwell sided with the patriot cause, serving as a colonel in the Connecticut State Militia, and as a member of the Committee of Correspondence. Built in 1675, his house was probably enlarged to serve as a tavern, and was known for many years as the “Leffingwell Inn.”

The Leffingwell House Museum is open to the public for tours.

Shaw Mansion

Shaw Mansion

Nathaniel Shaw Jr. served as Connecticut’s Naval Agent, so throughout the Revolution the lavish Shaw Mansion served as headquarters for the state’s navy as well as sixty privateers. It was one of the few buildings to survive the burning of New London by Benedict Arnold in 1781. The Mansion is now the home of the New London County Historical Society.

Brooklyn Historical Society

Brooklyn Historical Society

The imposing monument in front of the Brooklyn Historical Society Museum commemorates Revolutionary War hero Israel Putnam, who was often credited for issuing the order, “Don’t fire until you see the whites of their eyes” at the Battle of Breed’s (Bunker) Hill.

Huntington Homestead

Huntington Homestead

This house had just two rooms when Samuel Huntington, president of the 2nd Continental Congress and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was born here. Huntington also served as president of Congress under the Articles of Confederation, and was governor of Connecticut from 1786-1796. The Huntington Homestead Museum is open to the public.

First Congregational Church, Lebanon

First Congregational Church, Lebanon
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Featured Places, Houses & Private Sites

From fiery sermons against English rule to pleas for parishioners to send donations to the people of blockaded Boston, Lebanon’s clergy helped push local residents to support independence. The current church was designed by Revolutionary War veteran and artist John Trumbull in 1804.

New London Harbor Light

New London Harbor Light
Lighthouse in New London, CT

New London Harbor Light

Established as a beacon in the early 1700s, New London Harbor Light was formally established as a lighthouse in 1759. Benedict Arnold landed his troops here prior to burning down the city in 1781. It is the fourth lighthouse recognized by George Washington when he enacted the 1789 Act for the Establishment and support of Lighthouse, Beacons, Buoys, and Public Piers.

Trumbull Cemetery

Trumbull Cemetery
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Monuments & Markers

The Trumbull Cemetery contains many examples by Obadiah Wheeling, considered the greatest of the rural carvers in the area.

Lebanon Historical Society

Lebanon Historical Society
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Museums and Historical Societies

856 Trumbull Highway, Lebanon, CT
PO Box 151, Lebanon, CT 06249
860-642-6579; fax 860-642-6583

Mission

The mission of the Lebanon Historical Society is to preserve and interpret all aspects of the history of Lebanon, from its earliest inhabitants to the present day, with a special emphasis on the role of Lebanon in the American Revolution.